Dao Yin Health Qigong Workshop – Sitting Forms

by ausWushu

* Epping Creative Centre * 
Saturday 18 April 2020  
12.30 pm – 3.30 pm

Dao Yin is a set of Qigong exercises adapted from over 50 ancient forms. It consists of twelve movements designed by the Chinese Health Qigong Association. The movements are easy to learn, suitable for all ages and can be practised in both standing and sitting positions. 

This simple and accessible regime that may be varied in intensity to suit the individual, is perfect for anyone (whether experienced Qigong practitioners or complete beginners) wishing to learn the potent traditional forms that have practised by the Chinese for thousands of years.

It is aimed to strengthen the functioning of the energy (Qi) and blood (Xue) to flow freely from the head to the toes to nourish the internal organs and boost our immune system to promote health and well-being. Each exercise is performed a set number of times and co-ordinated with deep breathing to make it the most effective. The movements can be practised separately or in a set sequence; they also can be used alongside other practices like Tai Chi.

Learning the sitting set of Shi Er Fa will equip teachers with effective exercises to teach both individually and in groups, including children, people with disabilities and older people.

Download poster for this event

Get your tickets @Eventbrite now!

Dao Yin Health Qigong Workshop – Sitting Forms (Shi Er Fa)

by ausWushu

* Epping Creative Centre * 
Saturday 14 March 2020  
12.30 pm – 3.30 pm

Dao Yin is a set of Qigong exercises adapted from over 50 ancient forms. It consists of twelve movements designed by the Chinese Health Qigong Association. The movements are easy to learn, suitable for all ages and can be practised in both standing and sitting positions. 

This simple and accessible regime that may be varied in intensity to suit the individual, is perfect for anyone (whether experienced Qigong practitioners or complete beginners) wishing to learn the potent traditional forms that have practised by the Chinese for thousands of years.

It is aimed to strengthen the functioning of the energy (Qi) and blood (Xue) to flow freely from the head to the toes to nourish the internal organs and boost our immune system to promote health and well-being. Each exercise is performed a set number of times and co-ordinated with deep breathing to make it the most effective. The movements can be practised separately or in a set sequence; they also can be used alongside other practices like Tai Chi.

Learning the sitting set of Shi Er Fa will equip teachers with effective exercises to teach both individually and in groups, including children, people with disabilities and older people.

Download poster for this event

Get your tickets @Eventbrite now!

Practising Bodily Attention, Cultivating Bodily Awareness – a Phenomenological Exploration of Tai Chi Practices

by Sara Kim Hjortborg and Susanne Ravn

Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health
(September 2019) 

Abstract

Tai Chi (Taijiquan, T’ai Chi Ch’uan) is a martial arts form which aims at developing conscious awareness through the physical medium in specialised movement practices. In this article, we investigate how bodily attention is practised and might possibly affect the way the body is present to the bodily awareness of Tai Chi practitioners. The article draws on phenomenological clarifications of attention and awareness in an analysis of ethnographic fieldwork carried out during 10 months in two different Tai Chi practices, a) a modern sporting practice also known as Wushu Tai Chi, which is practised in China, and b) a traditional non-sporting practice in the Yang-style, Huang Sheng Shyan system, as it is practised in Denmark. The two types of Tai Chi practices differed in their execution of movements and practice aims. Nevertheless, both types are based on practices of bodily attention through the continuous and deliberate processes of engaging the moving body. Hence, despite the different ways of orchestrating bodily attention, bodily awareness was cultivated and opened up for a transition from a mediated body to an interconnected and unmediated awareness of the body as a whole. The present study has particularly expanded on perspectives of how athletes can assist and actively use bodily attention during skilled movement practices to improve and expand their movement expertise in their cultivation of bodily awareness.

Keywords: Bodily attention, bodily awareness, tai chi practice, taijiquan, phenomenology, ethnographic fieldwork, mind-body practices

Authors’ information:

Sara Kim Hjortborg has a Master’s degree in Sports and Health from the department of Sports Science & Clinical Biomechanics, the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark and is currently doing a PhD at the department of Cognitive Science at Macquarie University. Her research focuses on martial arts in relation to interdisciplinary research in phenomenology and qualitative research as well as philosophy and cognitive science.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Susanne Ravn is Associate professor and Head of the Research Unit Movement, Culture and Society at the Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark. Her doctoral work (2008) focuses on the phenomenological approaches to skilled movement in dance practice. She has published widely on the phenomenology of dance and on the integration of qualitative research methodologies into phenomenological analysis of different kinds of movement practices. Ravn has been the leading investigator on several funded research projects on topics such as improvisation; phenomenology and skilled performance in sport, respectively.

 

Jin Yong and the Kungfu Industrial Complex

by Paul B. Foster

Chinese Literature Today, 8:2, 68-76,

Abstract

This article is a general introduction to the cultural impact of Jin Yong’s works beyond original serialization as they contribute to the construction of the “kungfu industrial complex”—a complicated, multi-dimensional cultural/business matrix related to the production and consumption of Jin Yong’s (and other martial arts writers’) works and legacy. Three selected overlapping areas of impact of Jin Yong’s novels introduced in this article include: kungfu cultural literacy; rhetorical kungfu; and kungfu star power. Kungfu cultural literacy presents a broad look at the cultural content of Jin Yong’s works. Examples highlight Jin Yong’s contributions in each of these areas. Rhetorical kungfu is demonstrated through analysis of Jin Yong’s humorously subversive language in The Deer and the Cauldron and The Demi-Gods and Semi-Devils. Analysis of kungfu star power sketches the role of Shaw Brothers Studios and their TVB actors training program with particular attention to the careers of “The Five Tigers of TVB.”

Author information:
Dr. Paul B. Foster received his Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Literatures from the Ohio State University (1996). His specialty is the study of Lu Xun 鲁迅, the icon of Modern Chinese Literature. Dr. Foster is the author of Ah Q Archaeology: Lu Xun, Ah Q, Ah Q Progeny and the National Character Discourse in Twentieth Century China (Lexington Press, 2006), as well as a number of journal articles and conference papers. Dr. Foster’s current research is on the “kungfu industrial complex,” analyzing kungfu fiction, film and popular culture, with a special focus on the martial art fiction master, Jin Yong 金庸.

Promoting study abroad is a particular priority for Dr. Foster, who views this experience as a crucial part of students’ overall education. Dr. Foster designed, developed and co-directed the University System of Georgia Summer Study in China, and designed, developed, and alternately co-directs or coordinates GT School of Modern Languages’ intensive summer Chinese language program in Shanghai and Qingdao, the China LBAT.

Dr. Foster teaches the spectrum of Chinese language courses and enjoys introducing students to contemporary Chinese culture at the upper level through varied media, having created courses to teach language and culture through Pop Music & Culture, Kungfu/Martial Arts Fiction, Strategy & the Art of War, Kungfu & Wuxia Film, and Lu Xun & Modern Chinese Literature. 

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Full Article: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/21514399.2019.1674616?needAccess=true